MI-CIS ICAT Michigan Crisis Intervention System Advanced Course

16 Hours – Michigan Crisis Intervention System Advanced Course: Integrating Communications, Assessment and Tactics (MI-CIS and ICAT) – Todd CHRISTENSEN

Activity: ICAT is a training program that provides first responding police officers with the tools, skills, and options they need to successfully and safely defuse a range of critical incidents.  Developed by PERF with input from hundreds of police professionals from across the United States, ICAT takes the essential building blocks of critical thinking, crisis intervention, communications, and tactics, and puts them together in an integrated approach to training.

ICAT is designed especially for situations involving persons who are unarmed or are armed with weapons other than firearms, and who may be experiencing a mental health or other crisis.  The training program is anchored by the Critical Decision-Making Model that helps officers assess situations, make safe and effective decisions, and document and learn from their actions.  ICAT incorporates different skill sets into a unified training approach that emphasizes scenario-based exercises, as well as lecture and case study opportunities.

Day One- Activity Time: 8 hours:

Module 1: Introduction- 1 hour

Learning Objectives: Through classroom instruction and discussion, introduce the training modules included in the ICAT Training Guide. At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe why this training is important and needed.
  • Describe the key elements and focus of the ICAT training guide.
  • Articulate how ICAT is designed to make the job of patrol officers safer and more effective when responding to many critical incidents, in particular those involving subjects in a behavioral crisis who are acting erratically and who are either unarmed or armed with a weapon other than a firearm.

Module 2: Critical Decision-Making Model- 1.5-2 hours

Learning Objectives: Through classroom instruction and discussion, introduce and explain the Critical Decision-Making Model (CDM) for use by patrol officers in managing critical incidents, especially those involving subjects who are not armed with firearms and who may be experiencing a mental health or other crisis. At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the key principles of the Critical Decision-Making Model (CDM).
  • Explain each of the five steps of the CDM.
  • Understand and articulate the benefits of the CDM.
  • Use the CDM to describe the actions of a police officer handling a critical incident, though a video case study.

Module 3: Crisis Recognition- 1.5-2 hours

Learning Objectives: Through classroom instruction and discussion, the student will learn basic skills of how to recognize a person in behavioral crisis. The student will be able to identify key behaviors and learn some basic tips and techniques to begin to defuse critical incidents involving persons in crisis and move toward a safe resolution. At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Successfully identify behaviors associated with a person experiencing behavioral crisis.
  • Successfully recognize clues that indicate the difference between criminal behavior and the behavior of someone experiencing a behavioral crisis.
  • Successfully recognize the signs of someone attempting suicide-by-cop.
  • Describe and recognize the value of the emotional-rational thinking scale.

Module 4: Tactical Communications-2 hours

Learning Objectives: Through classroom instruction, discussion, exercises, and video case study, the student will learn basic principles and concepts of crisis response using tactical communications, and developing the necessary skills to safely and effectively communicate during many critical incidents. The student will learn key active listening and verbal and non-verbal skills that are especially valuable for defusing tense situations and gaining voluntary compliance from subjects. Students will also have a better understanding of persons who hear distressing voices through a hearing voices simulation exercise. At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Use a range of communications skills to their tactical advantage.
  • Explain the concepts and importance of active listening and demonstrate the use of key active listening skills.
  • Explain how non-verbal communications affect interactions with others and demonstrate the use of key non-verbal communications skills.
  • Demonstrate key verbal communications skills that are critical to defusing tense situations and gaining voluntary compliance.
  • Develop and use a variety of alternatives to shouting “Drop the knife” if that command does not generate compliance after repeated uses.
  • Understand how persons who hear distressing voices may respond differently than persons who do not.

Module 5: Operational Tactics- 2 hours.

Learning Objectives: Through classroom instruction, discussion, exercises, and a video case study, the student will learn additional skills to safely and effectively respond to and resolve critical incidents involving subjects who are armed with weapons other than a firearm. Using the Critical Decision-Making Model, students will explore pre-response, response, and post-response considerations, and focus on both their individual actions and teamwork. At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate critical pre-response and response requirements for critical incidents.
  • Explain use of the Critical Decision-Making Model (CDM) in responding to and managing a critical incident.
  • Demonstrate and explain key tactical expectations and roles when responding to a critical incident as a team.
  • Explain concepts such as “tactical pause,” “distance + cover = time,” and “tactical repositioning.”
  • Apply appropriate tactical considerations to suicide-by-cop situations.
  • Participate in an effective after-action review of a critical incident.
  • Use the CDM to explain key post-response expectations following a critical incident.

Day Two- Activity Time: 8 hours:

Module 6: Integration and Practice- 8 hours.

Learning Objectives: Through scenario-based training and a video case study, the student will review and practice the range of skills needed to safely and effectively stabilize, manage and resolve critical incidents involving subjects not armed with a firearm. Skills related to critical decision-making, crisis recognition and response, tactical communications, and operational safety tactics will be reviewed and practiced in an integrated, hands-on manner. . At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate their understanding of the key concepts covered in the ICAT training.
  • Demonstrate their ability to put those concepts into practice through successful completion of scenario-based training exercises.
  • Better recognize “suicide-by-cop” encounters and demonstrate the skills to successfully defuse and resolve these situations.
  • Explain the use of the Critical Decision-Making Model (CDM) in managing and resolving critical incidents.
1 Review of Modules 2-5 15-minutes
2 Learning Activity- 1 Video Case Study- Shenandoah County, VA 45
3 Learning Activity- 2 Scenario #1- Suicidal Person with Knife (Veteran) 30
4 Learning Activity- 3 Scenario #2- Person in Behavioral crisis with baseball bat 30
5 Learning Activity- 4 Scenario #3- Intoxicated Person Refusing to Leave 30
6 Learning Activity- 5 Scenario #4- Agitated Person with Knife- Suicide-by-Cop 30
7 Learning Activity- 6 Scenario #5- MILO Range Use of Force immersive simulation 30
8 Recap and Discussion with end of course evaluation 30

Bio

Todd Christensen worked 30 years as a law enforcement officer and retired from Kalamazoo Public Safety in 2012. He served as an operator on the Kalamazoo SWAT Team for 9 years, specializing in Hostage Rescue. Todd developed the teams’ first ever SWAT Medic program and was instrumental in co-producing the departments first “responding to active shooter/violence” training programs. Todd worked his entire career in the patrol division that included assignment to the community policing unit, honor guard, explorer program, field training officer, FTO Instructor, defensive tactics instructor and ice rescue instructor. Todd has been an instructor for 22 years and taught at the KVCC police academy. He specializes in subject control/Use-of-force, physical fitness, behavioral health crisis intervention tactics and safety. He has presented at the National Police Fleet Expo, Michigan- CIT conference, two Michigan association of EMS Instructor/coordinators conferences and Michigan Developmental Disabilities conference. Todd is currently the Project Manager of the Michigan- Crisis Intervention System (MI-CIS) at Western Michigan University Homer Stryker M.D. School of Medicine and certified as a Force Science Institute analyst. His published works include: Out of the Darkness and Into the Blue.